Five reasons to be excited about Microsoft Data Insights Summit!

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I’m delighted to be speaking at Microsoft Data Summit! I’m pumped about my session, which focuses on Power BI for the CEO. I’m also super happy to be attending the Microsoft Data Summit for five top reasons (and others, but five is a nice number!). I’m excited about all of the Excel, Power BI, DAX and Data Science goodies. Here are some sample session titles:

Live Data Streaming in Power BI

Data Science for Analysts

What’s new in Excel

Embed R in Power BI

Spreadsheet Management and Compliance (It is a topic that keeps me up at night!)

Book an in-person appointment with a Microsoft expert with the online Schedule Builder. Bring your hard – or easy – questions! In itself, this is a real chance to speak to Microsoft directly and get expert, indepth  help from the team who make the software that you love.

Steven Levitt of Freakonomics is speaking and I’m delighted to hear him again. I’ve heard him present recently and he was very funny whilst also being insightful. I think you’ll enjoy his session. You’ll know him from Freakonomics.

freakonomics

I’m excited that James Phillips is delivering a keynote! I have had the pleasure of meeting him a few times and I am really excited about where James and the Power BI team have taken Power BI. I’m sure that there will be good things as they steam ahead, so James’ keynote is unmissable!

Alberto Cairo is presenting a keynote! Someone who always makes me sit up a bit straighter when they tweet is Alberto Cairo, and I’m delighted he’s attending. I hope I can get to meet him in person. Whether Alberto is tweeting about data visualisation, design or the world in general, it’s always insightful. I have his latest book and I hope I can ask him to sign it.

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Tons of other great speakers! Now someone I haven’t seen for ages – too long in fact – is Rob Collie. Rob is President of PowerPivotPro and you simply have to hear him speak on the topic. He’s direct in explaining how things work, and you will learn from him. I’m glad to see Marco Russo is speaking and I love his sessions. In fact, at TechEd North America, I only got to see one session because I was so busy with presenting, booth duty etc… but I managed to get to see a session and I made sure it was Marco Russo and Alberto Ferrari’s session.  Chris Webb is also presenting and his sessions are always amazing. I have to credit Chris in part for where I am today, because his blog kept me sane and his generosity during sessions meant that I never felt stupid asking him questions. I’m learning too – always.

Ok, that’s five things but there are plenty more. Why not see for yourself?

Join me at the conference, June 12–13, 2017 in Seattle, WA — and be sure to sign up for your 1:1 session with a Microsoft expert.

Happy Birthday Power BI! London PUG News #PowerBI

To the Power BI Team – Happy Birthday and congratulations on all of your achievements! You’ve spawned a fantastic product plus a wonderful ecosystem of creative partners, happy consultants, MVPs and Community Contributors, User Group Leaders, and, of course, don’t forget the users. I’d like to thank and congratulate you! I appear in the video, a little way in.

Here’s a video that we all put together; Adam Saxton (@GuyInACube) put it together and worked with Paul Turley did the cat herding getting MVPs together.

Continuing the work, I’m one of the co-organizers of the London Power BI meetup, and we are having a Finance focused meetup this Thursday. Please find more details here amd register here:

Power BI in Financial Services – Rishi Sapra

Rishi will demo Power BI to analyse and visualise some financial datasets and explain why it is just perfect for Financial Services. This includes how and why analysts might move from Excel to PBI for data analysis/discovery as well as a high level view of how Microsoft are positioned within the self-serve/enterprise BI space compared to vendors such as Qlik, Tableau and IBM. Key topics to be covered include:

•  Overview of key functionality of Power BI and how it helps meet the needs of analysts working in Financial Services

•  A look at the EBA Stress Test dataset – both in Excel and then in Power BI

•  A Hands-on demo of working with this data to carry out data cleansing/transformation, calculations and visuals

•  How you can share your reports, keep the data up to date and apply security access by publishing to the Power BI portal.

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See you there!

 

 

WPC Day One: Translating Digital Transformation into Solutions

I blogged over at my ‘official’ company blog about strategic considerations regarding Digital Transformation. There is a lot of messaging directed at sales, partners and CEO level conversations. For the techies, however, how does the strategy translate into a technical implementation that you can actually deliver, to facilitate Digital Transformation within the organisation? In other words, how do you make solutions that are sustainable and relevant?

Microsoft can help with modern, cloud-based tools and a cloud platform. Partners have the ability to use tools such as Office365, Power BI, Microsoft Flow and AzureML to reduce the integration cost and friction to deliver technical solutions. These partners can speak directly to the digital transformation, and lead it. These tools can form composable units or modules, which can be fitted together to meet business needs directly, thereby facilitating digital transformation.

What are these tools? During the WPC keynote, Ecolabs showed off their solution, which involved Power Bi and Microsoft Flow. Here is the example Microsoft Power BI Solution below:
WPC Day 1 Slides
Microsoft Flow is a new tool, which was used to create some of the workflows to align the productivity processes with the resulting dashboard.

What is Microsoft Flow? Well, it’s a great little app and I think you should take a look. Microsoft Flow allows you to create automated workflows between your business or consumer applications and services and connects them so that you get some action, such as notifications, synchronize files, collect data, and more actions that might be useful to your business.

Why is that useful for a Business Intelligence implementation? Well, it can help to track where your data is going. As someone who often goes into organisations where people have ‘lost’ data or it is hiding somewhere that the business people can’t get it, I see Microsoft Flow as a way forward for Digital Transformation in the business by facilitating the flow of data around the organisation.

You can even create workflows on your mobile device. Here is the Ecolabs example from WPC:
WPC Day 1 Slides
Basically, a Flow connects your web services, files, and cloud-based data to save time and effort for everyone, every day.

It’s good to see that Microsoft are a much more open organisation these days; I think that Microsoft Flow is evidence of the open attitude towards other companies, organisations and methodologies that are outside of the Microsoft corporate boundary. In particular, I am a huge fan of Wunderlist and they mentioned it yesterday during the Day One keynote. I know that Wunderlist have been bought by Microsoft and I hope that Wunderlist will appear in Office365 soon, such as in Outlook.

How does Flow work? Well, you start with a template, which gives you a great head start. Why not give it a blast? If it means you get to use Wunderlist as well for all of your lists, and start to love it, then you can thank me!

 

You could even use Microsoft Flow for new Github issues, and send a notification to Slack. Or perhaps you could use Flow so that you retain Dropbox as your file storage system, integrated with Office365. The examples are endless, I think.

All this shows that the cloud is a great enabler, and a platform, which partners and companies can use in order to make their organisations more productive and collaborative. These are simple examples, and I’m sure that you can think of more! The integrations all happen in the cloud, and it is one way that the cloud can be used as a tool for Digital Transformation.

Any questions, send me an email at hello@datarelish.com.

Kind Regards,

Jen Stirrup

JenStirrup

 

 

PASS Summit Notes for my AzureML, R and Power BI Presentation

I’m going to have fun with my AzureML session today at PASS Summit! More will follow on this post later; I am racing off to the keynote so I don’t have long 🙂

I heard some folks weren’t sure whether to attend my session or Chris Webb’s session. I’m honestly flattered but I’m not in the same league as Chris! I’ve posted my notes here so that folks can go off and attend Chris’ session, if they are stuck between the two.

Here is the order of things:

  • Slide Deck
  • How do you choose a machine learning algorithm?
  • How do you carry out an AzureML project?
  • AzureML Experiment 
  • R Code

So, the slide deck is here:

  • AzureML Experiment 

You can see this experiment in the AzureML Gallery. You may have to sign up for a Windows Live account to get a free AzureML studio account, and I recommend that you do.

  • How do you choose a machine learning algorithm?

Kudos to Microsoft – this is their cheatsheet and I recommend that you look at the original page.

Here is some more information on the topic from Microsoft, and I recommend that you follow it.

How do you carry out an AzureML project?

Try the CRISP-DM Framework for a start

See the Modelling Agency for the original source. https://the-modeling-agency.com/crisp-dm.pdf

CRISP-DM Process Diagram.png
CRISP-DM Process Diagram” by Kenneth JensenOwn work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons.

R Code

Here’s a sample R code. I know it is simple, and there are better ways of doing this. However, remember that this is for instructional purposes in front of +/- 500 people so I want to be sure everyone has a grounding before we talk more complicated things.

You may have to install the libraries first, if you haven’t done so.

library(data.table)
library(ggplot2)
library(xtable)
library(rpart)
require(xtable)
require(data.table)
require(ggplot2)
require(rpart)

summary(adult.data)
class(adult.data)

# Let’s rename the columns
names(adult.data)[1]<-“age”
names(adult.data)[2]<-“workclass”
names(adult.data)[3]<-“fnlwgt”
names(adult.data)[4]<-“education”
names(adult.data)[5]<-“education.num”
names(adult.data)[6]<-“marital.status”
names(adult.data)[7]<-“occupation”
names(adult.data)[8]<-“relationship”
names(adult.data)[9]<-“race”
names(adult.data)[10]<-“sex”
names(adult.data)[11]<-“capital.gain”
names(adult.data)[12]<-“capital.loss”
names(adult.data)[13]<-“hours.per.week”
names(adult.data)[14]<-“country”
names(adult.data)[15]<-“earning_level”

# Let’s see if the columns renamed well
# What is the maximum age of the adult?
# How much data is missing?
summary(adult.data)

# How many rows do we have?
# 32561 rows, 15 columns
dim(adult.data)

# There are lots of different ways to deal with missing data
# That would be a session in itself!
# For demo purposes, we are simply going to replace question marks, and remove rows which have anything missing.

adult.data$workclass <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$workclass))
adult.data$education <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$education))
adult.data$marital.status <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$marital.status))
adult.data$occupation <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$occupation))
adult.data$relationship <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$relationship))
adult.data$race <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$race))
adult.data$sex <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$sex, fixed = TRUE))
adult.data$country <- as.factor(gsub(“[?]”, NA, adult.data$country))

is.na(adult.data) = adult.data==’?’
is.na(adult.data) = adult.data==’ ?’
adult.tidydata = na.omit(adult.data)

# Let’s check out our new data set, called adult.tidydata
summary(adult.tidydata)

# How many rows do we have?
# 32561 rows, 15 columns
dim(adult.tidydata)

# Let’s visualise the data
boxplot(adult.tidydata$education.num~adult.tidydata$earning_level,outline=F,xlab=”Income Level”,ylab=”Education Level”,main=”Income Vs Education”)

prop.table(table(adult.tidydata$earning_level,adult.tidydata$occupation),2)
for (i in 1:ncol(adult.tidydata)-2) {
if (is.factor(adult.tidydata[,i])){
pl =ggplot(adult.tidydata,aes_string(colnames(adult.tidydata)[i],fill=”earning_level”))+geom_bar(position=”dodge”) + theme(axis.text.x=element_text(angle=75))
print(pl)
}

}

evalq({
plot <- ggplot(data = adult.tidydata, aes(x = hours.per.week, y = education.num,
colour = hours.per.week))
plot <- plot + geom_point(alpha = 1/10)
plot <- plot + ggtitle(“Hours per Week vs Level of Education”)
plot <- plot + stat_smooth(method = “lm”, se = FALSE, colour = “red”, size = 1)
plot <- plot + xlab(“Education Level”) + ylab(“Hours per Week worked”)
plot <- plot + theme(legend.position = “none”)
plot
})

That’s all for now! More later.

Jen xx

Upcoming Microsoft Azure webinars on Azure Machine Learning and Cortana Analytics

I found these webinars over at the Microsoft site, and I’m reposting them here for you:

Introduction to Azure Data Factory with Wee Hyong Tok, Senior Program Manager at Microsoft
August 4, 2015 at 10am PDT 

This webinar is held by Microsoft, and I recommend you tune in if you want to learn more about Azure Data Factory. It enables you to process on-premises data like SQL Server, together with cloud data like Azure SQL Database, Blobs, and Tables. Wee Hyong Tok will help you to understand Data Factory capabilities, and the scenarios where Data Factory can be applied. Click here to register.

If you want to translate the time for this webinar into your own timezone, please click here.

Harness Predictive Customer Churn Models with Cortana Analytics Suite with Wee Hyong Tok, Senior Program Manager at Microsoft
August 18, 2015 at 10am PDT

This webinar is held by Microsoft, and I will be tuning in so I can drink all the good Cortana Analytics goodness!

In this session, Wee Hyong Tok will show you how to build a real-life churn model with Azure Machine Learning, make it enterprise-ready with Azure Data Factory, and deliver data insights with Power BI. Click here to register.

If you want to translate the time for this webinar into your own timezone, please click here.

Click on the image for the original Cortana announcement at WPC15.

Cortana Analytics News Roundup

If you found missed Joseph Sirosh’s webinar on Cortana Analytics, Click here to view the webinar. If you don’t have time for that, then Click here to download a copy of the slides that were presented.

If you are interested in a review by an industry analyst, I’d recommend Andrew Brust’s article on Cortana from ZDNet. Mary-Jo Foleys’ original ZDNet article on the announcement from WPC is also a good read.

If you are interested in in-person events, then be sure to sign up for the Cortana Analytics Workshop planned September 10-11, 2015 at Microsoft Campus in Redmond. I wish I could attend, but unfortunately that’s not possible.

Also keep a watch on the Machine Learning Blog site, where the team will be publishing out more information on an ongoing basis.