Invisible voices of #diversity: being ignored, being hepeated, and what you can do to be heard and help others to be heard

One of the issues of diversity is that people can suffer from diversity myopia, which I understand to be the situation where people don’t see diversity clearly. I now think that the issue is that sometimes that people from diverse backgrounds are simply not seen in the first place. Like the protagonist in the Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison, you’re simply not seen in the first place.

What if this happens to you? What can you do about it? In thist post, I’m going to discuss why this happens, and what you can do about it.

Not Seeing Clearly, or not Seeing at All?

This is a key challenge in diversity. People can unthinkingly believe that they accept people regardless of backgrounds, but the reality is, they don’t always see them. This forms a confirmation bias, since we don’t measure ourselves on the data that we haven’t seen. To be really diverse, you have to see first. If someone remains ‘invisible’ and ‘unseen’, then their voices aren’t heard of their voices are ignored. This means that unthinking people are unconsciously unaware that they don’t move from ‘seeing’ to ‘understanding’ diversity. And people don’t ‘understand’ diversity if they can’t ‘see’ it, which means that they never come to value diversity.

Therefore, when dealing with people from different backgrounds, there can be instances of ‘not seeing’. For example, if someone ignores my participation in an email thread and forks a new thread that ignores my contribution, it tells me that I’m simply not being ‘seen’ in people’s inboxes. Right away, they just pass over the name, so I get dismissed right away as irrelevant.

But that was my idea…. Being Hepeated

It can also lead to instances of he-peating, where someone takes or copies your contribution and then owns it, and I think it’s probably because the idea has impinged itself upon the hepeater but you haven’t done so. Your idea has made it’s way to someone’s consciousness, but you haven’t made it. If you complain about it, then this can be interpreted as ‘unladylike’ behaviour and people only remember that you complained about something. It’s easy to ignore somoene as a complainer, than it is to really question yourself over your behaviour.

Mastering the Lizard Brain

crocodile-2434838_1920Mastering the lizard brain really developing a harsh lens on yourself to obtain self-awareness and realize your impact on others. It’s my hunch that many adults never reach that stage of development at all, but if you are leader, then you have to be very self-honest to strive to master the lizard brain.

Ask yourself hard questions. What would you think if someone did that to you? Can you see things throug their lens? It becomes very uncomfortable to ask yourself if you are really diverse or not. We like to live in the comfort zone but that’s not where the growth takes place.

Reasons or excuses? You have to ask yourself if you are giving yourself reasons or giving yourself excuses.

Something isn’t true just because you said it. In conversation, I can hear someone give themselves an excuse for behaving in a certain way, and it can seem as if they accept it as truth simply because they said it.  Our brains fool us into being directed down that path, because we said it.

Again, it’s about mastering the lizard brain and being flexible and adaptable to new data and analysis of ourselves, even if we feel uncomfortable.

What can you do to be heard?

timeout-3373329_1920I think that a lot of people struggle with this issue. I know that I do. Why does this happen?

I’m going to propose ways that you can try to overcome these issues.

 

 

Always add value to the meeting or conversation. Don’t use weasel words. Remove phrases from your vocabulary such as ‘I think’, ‘perhaps’, ‘in my opinion, ‘this could just be me but maybe’ and other weasel words.

Practice speaking up more, and with more confidence and power. Ask yourself; do I sound sure or do I invalidate myself with disclaimer type phrases?

Try to learn to interrupt politely. There are some great tips here. Here’s my favourite idea and I do this a lot: in a business meeting with a lot of people with big egos, pauses dont’ come often so you will have to jump in. You’ll seem less rude if you first restate (“If I hear you correctly, you’re saying XYZ’ and then follow on from there.

Learn to hold the floor when you speak. You can do this by adding some colour to what someone else has just said (e.g. ‘following on from Jane’s point) but adding new insights that add depth or breadth.

masks-1242822_1920You can set up allies in the room so you can echo and support each other. I have had to do this, and it doesn’t feel good because it feels like you’ve already lost before you’ve opened your mouth. However, it does work and it will help you to network and get things done under the radar.

Learn to sell your achievements without going overboard e.g. ‘my team and I’ is a nice starter as a way of discussing your achievements.

Sit near the centre of the table or the floor. Sitting at the side or the back can mean it’s harder to grab and retain attention.

Be judicious in allowing yourself to be interrupted. If someone simply repeats what you said, pretty much, then be careful that it isn’t a potential hepeater.

Practice and improvisation. I did a course in improv, and it helped a lot. Here’s a reference if you’d like to follow this up: Leading with Applied Improv with Izzy Gesell. There’s a lot of wisdom there and I recommend that you follow it up on LinkedIn. https://www.linkedin.com/learning/leading-with-applied-improv/reflection-leadership-and-empathy

When you think about this list for yourself, keep others in mind, too. You can be the person that brings others along a journey to new heights and experiences in their career, thereby building your network and being a leader. Think about the lizard brain in yourself and others.

 

 

 

Learnings and Takeaways from my #Diversity and Inclusion Unconference at Microsoft Ignite #MSIgnite

On Thursday 27th September, I held an Unconference at Microsoft Ignite which was aimed at Diversity and Inclusion. I was incredibly lucky to be supported by the Diversity and Inclusion initiative by Microsoft, who have put it at front-and-centre of everything that they do. Although it is only one event, I was told that my event had the highest proportion of male attendees at the event. I had 80 people turn up in the end, and I was too busy facilitating the conference to take a note for myself but I was pleased that everyone turned out to join us. I want to say thank you to everyone who attended.

Introducing Collaboration through an Unconference

The Unconference really means that people can engage, connect and share themselves rather than having a speaker talk to them. It’s collaborative and energetic, with a free-form fluid style. There are lots of different ways to implement it, and you can find more information on how to prepare an Unconference for yourself here.

Diversity and Inclusion Unconference

To encourage participation, I didn’t want to use a traditional top-down lecture session and I wanted to have a collaborative, open, honest and innovative event that meant people would have a great time meeting other attendees, plus engage with each other. Ignite is a large event at 30,000 people and it is very easy to get lost, and not talk to anyone all week. Unconferences are a more relevant, engaging, and interactive event format.

It also means that there is room for the introvert, the extrovert, or for people who don’t feel that they have got anything to say. Feeling ‘idealess’ is horrible and it’s important for people to learn about diversity, so I wanted to create a space for people who felt awkward about contributing as well as those who were happy to take centre stage. Ultimately, I wanted people to feel as if they could be themselves.

How did I do it? Here are some practical takeaways for you to try at your own events. I learned from Jackson Katz, a prominent Diversity speaker who gives a message which resonates strongly with me. I have put Jackson Katz’ Ted Talk here because he gives very strong messages about gender violence. As a survivor, it was initially very important to me that a gentleman spoke out, because people will listen to him in a way that they won’t listen to me, and I’d like to thank Jackson Katz for his work. Katz posits that the language of diversity can mean that white men get erased from a conversation that fundamentally includes them, too.

Diversity can be perceived as a women’s issue that some good men help out with. We need to change that.

Diversity impacts everyone and it is the only thing that we have in common. By focusing on women, it can mean that men get an excuse not to listen. The gentlemen who take the excuse not to listen are the ones that we want to reach.

Ensure your Abstract is aimed at Everyone: Not just Women

My title was called: Diversity and Inclusion: Why is it important, and what can we do about it? The abstract went as follows:

For people who want to build careers and manage teams, it is crucial to understand diversity and how it impacts your organization. Increasing the role of women in technology has a direct impact on the women working in hi-tech, but the effects can go far beyond that. How do female tech workers influence innovation and product development? How do men benefit from having more women working in technology? Can the presence of women in tech affect a company’s profit? Join a lively discussion on diversity, and hear proactive steps that individuals and companies can take in order to make diversity and inclusion part of the organizational DNA.

Be Inclusive – and that means men, too

I talked about being proactive, and what we could do. I believed that this language would speak to men and women alike. Speaking with men, they often ask what they can do to help and they want proactive prescriptive steps. They can sometimes feel that they can’t help in any diversity scenario since they don’t know what to do, or how to start. By putting this in the abstract, my intuition was borne out by having so many men turn up by making them feel included. I was helping them by giving them something actionable that they could do, and making diversity accessible through steps and sequences and patterns to follow.

Don’t make it into a Pity Party

Some WIT panels can turn into a pity party where we talk about how terrible everything is, and that’s the only topic on show. I have had some awful experiences and I am not meek in sharing them. However, I don’t feel I need to rail on about it, because that can make people feel that’s all I can talk about when, in fact, I talk about technology and successful projects and solutions instead.  So try to be balanced; Explain why it’s important, but also make sure that the topics cover solutions, too.

Topics we covered

We focused on women in technology, and the conversations naturally moved onto issues of colour, and particularly issues for women of colour. Since it was an Unconference, the topics move along naturally and it was great to see that the attendees took the Unconference idea to heart, and they ran with it. The summary was as follows:

The attendees believed that STEM Programs in schools would help to encourage everyone into science and tech.

At work, we should take a risk in getting to know and work beside people who are outside of our groups. This means right from the recruitment steps, and organizations can ‘screen in’ candidates rather than ‘screen out’ – for example, by giving room and doing a second run through CVs for evidence of soft skills.

We should also give support, and build people up; not tear them down. Women can view each other as competitors, and we need to create a safe culture and honestly support each other. Teach often, and teach early.

Some people suggested books to read, and here are a few. Click on the book to go to Amazon:

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I recommend the Invisible Man since it is incredibly powerful; it is an American classic, actually.

I haven’t read Whistling Vivaldi but it is my Audible audiobook this month.

Things I’d change for next time

I needed a scribe who would take notes for the Unconference. A scribe would have helped to keep note of the ideas.

I would have loved an artist to draw up the ideas as we went. One of my keynotes (held at a private, invite-only industry event held by a partner organization of Data Relish) actually had an artist, and he drew my keynote speech as we went along. It was amazing!

Conclusion

I believe that the Unconference seems to really work for Diversity and Inclusion topics, and the session feedback so far has been awesome. If you have any questions or thoughts, please leave a comment and I’ll be glad to hear from you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What I’m doing this week at #MSIgnite

I’m delighted to say that I’m doing the Community Reporter role for Microsoft Ignite. This means I get to interview the Microsoft Executive Team, such as Amir Netz, James Phillips and Joseph Sirosh. I have complete stars in my eyes! I don’t often get the chance to speak with them so I’m delighted to get to do that. Also, they are very interesting and they have a lot to say on topics I’m passionate about, so make sure and tune in for those. I’ll release more details about times and how you can watch as soon as I can.

What does a Community Reporter do? During Microsoft Ignite, the Community Reporters will be your go-to’s for live event updates. If you aren’t attending the conference this year, these reporters will be a great way to see what’s happening on-the-ground in Orlando. Check out my content on my blog here and on Twitter and LinkedIn follow me on social to stay up-to-date on all things Microsoft Ignite!

I’d also like to meet some of you so when I get the chance, I’ll tweet out to see if any introverted people fancy sitting at a table with me for breakfast or lunch to talk about all things data.

I am also speaking at Ignite so here are the details:

When? Thursday, September 27 4:30 PM – 5:15 PM
Where? Room W330 West 2 

Artificial intelligence is popularized in fictional films, but the reality is that AI is becoming a part of our daily lives, with virtual assistants like Cortana using the technology to empower productivity and make search easier. What does this mean for organizations that are running the Red Queen’s race not just to win, but to survive in a world where AI is becoming the present and future of technology? How can organizations evolve, adapt, and succeed using AI to stay at the forefront of the competition? What are the potential issues, complications, and benefits that AI could bring to us and our organizations? In this session, we discuss the relevance of AI to organizations, along with the path to success.

 

Microsoft Power BI, Microsoft R and SQL Server are being used to help tackle homelessness in London by providing actionable insights to improve the prevention of homelessness as well as the processes in place to help victims. Join this session to see how Microsoft technologies are helping a data science department to make a difference to the lives of families, by revealing insights into the contributors of homelessness in families in London and the surrounding area. Join this session to understand more about finding stories in data. The case study also demonstrates the practicalities of using Microsoft technologies to help some of the UK’s most vulnerable people using data science for social good.

When? Thursday, September 27 2:15 PM – 3:30 PM
Where? OCCC W222

For people who want to build careers and manage teams, it is crucial to understand diversity and how it impacts your organization. Increasing the role of women in technology has a direct impact on the women working in hi-tech, but the effects can go far beyond that. How do female tech workers influence innovation and product development? How do men benefit from having more women working in technology? Can the presence of women in tech affect a company’s profit? Join a lively discussion on diversity, and hear proactive steps that individuals and companies can take in order to make diversity and inclusion part of the organizational DNA.

One last thing!

Remember to download the Microsoft Ignite app to have your information handy on-the-go!

See you there!

 

 

Unpicking Diversity myopia: not seeing is not understanding, and not valuing differences

I’m excited about my Diversity meetup at Microsoft Ignite, and I wanted to share some thoughts about it in advance.

The term or word prejudice comes from the Latin prae + judicium meaning to try in advance. Prejudice is literally a pre-judgement about the characteristics and desirability of a person or a thing. Everyone has their heuristics about how the world works, but this can be dangerous when it slips into prejudices, and often we cannot see what these prejudices are.

I have been puzzling over the statement that I hear sometimes: I’m already diverse, I don’t need to worry about diversity because I never judge people on their race, gender or beliefs. I don’t think that’s true, and I think people can have a diversity myopia, which means that they believe that they place themselves beyond seeing differences in people, as if that makes them more logical somehow. My argument instead is that, by seeing, valuing and understanding differences, it gives us another superpower or another lens by which to understand situations, people, and ourselves. This is the true mark of a leader and it would make us better leaders to be able to see, understand and value diversity. However, we can’t hold the view consistently that we ‘don’t see differences’ and then claim to be already sensitive to diversity. If you don’t see, understand or value differences, then you can’t be sensitive to diversity, either.

Leaders who understand diversity, prejudice and the dynamics of change, will manage them better in themselves and in other people. We all experience work situations where our professional requirements, demands and responsibilities conflict with our ethics and values. The resolution of these situations require skills that are not part of any job descriptions: they require real thought. These are opportunities for reflexive leadership: self-reflection and deep thought, which is quite at odds with the way that we normally skate on the surface of our busy lives (Alvesson, Blom, and Sveningsson, 2016).

Diversity Myopia can be evidenced by the statement: “I see everyone purely in terms of merit and I don’t see their characteristics.”

To succeed, leaders need to be skilful in recognizing and managing diversity, as well as valuing it. Davidson (2011) puts forward this concept of leveraging differences to help us to navigate the complexities of diversity. Leveraging Differences is the ability to use people’s distinctiveness, uniqueness, competencies and perspectives in order to make the organization more effective. How can we leverage differences?

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Credit: https://pixabay.com/en/users/kellepics-4893063/ 

Seeing the Differences

Firstly, we have to see the difference. One of the signs of diversity myopia is the claim that one does not see differences. If you cannot see differences, how can you be sensitive to them? Some of the differences are obvious, such as language, sex or ethnicity. Other ways, such as specific disabilities which are not obvious, are not easy to see.

Understanding the Differences

It’s important to understand the differences in order to leverage them successfully, and to make people comfortable as part of your team. We can do this in all sorts of ways: for example, I have spent this weekend reading about religions with a focus on Islam and Zoroastrianism (Mazdayasna) in order to try and educate myself, and understand them better. I am not claiming to be an expert in either religion, but I learned a lot that I did not know before.

If we do not try to understand differences, then we are working on prejudices and over-simplified stereotypes. This means that we can be working under a confirmation bias, so self-awareness never impinges on our consciousness to hint that we are anything other than ‘diverse-aware’.

forward-3277752_1920

Valuing Differences

Understanding diversity can be transformative, and it results from an active and sustained seeing, understanding and respecting differences. There is no way that we can tick a box and state that we are ‘diverse-aware’ now. It is an ongoing process, and it is a long-term relationship which changes your life.

Priorities can change because you understand people’s priorities better. It means that you can start to care more deeply about other issues that others care about; the environment, for example. For me personally, it has given me a wider vision of the world that I live in, and it means that I have become a lot calmer about transient problems that I might otherwise have been. It also means that I can step away from people and problems that are simply toxic, because I have found other things to care about, and to spend my energy on. The thing with diversity is that it is amost addictive; it gives me more to care about, and I want to know more, so I learn more and that gives me more, bigger things to care about.

This is the personal changes that this has brought for me. What can you do in order to learn more about Diversity?

  • Be curious and learn
  • Be an active listener
  • Be prepared to have the humility and self-awareness to get things wrong
  • Be prepared to work at conflicts that matter, and to see them through, even if it challenges your core beliefs.
  • Be prepared to think that what other people have said is true.

Rethink the data outside of a confirmation bias. I think that this is missing from a lot of the dialogue that I see on Twitter, for example. Genuine grievances, such as the MeToo campaign, can be dismissed under the guise ‘that doesn’t happen everywhere’ or even disbelief disguised as a statement ‘if a woman really had been attacked, then she would not do this / go there / do that, would she?’ Inquiry and thoughtfulness can help us to be more open and understanding in communication.

What does diversity myopia mean for the business?

For the business, diversity can help us to understand our business processes and systems. It can help businesses to remain innovative and engaged with customers and team members, because the veil of having diversity-myopia has been lifted.

Seeing, understanding and valuing differences is challenging, but it can help us to move in directions that we didn’t see before.

I am learning a lot, and I will continue to do so for the rest of my life. I look forward to your thoughts and comments.

References

Alvesson, M., Blom, M. and Sveningsson, S., 2016. Reflexive Leadership: Organising in an imperfect world. Sage.

Davidson, M.N., 2011. The end of diversity as we know it: Why diversity efforts fail and how leveraging difference can succeed. Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

Why is it so difficult to report harassment, and what can you do to help?

This is a personal blog and it is from the heart. This incident is separate from the MeToo incident that I wrote about previously.

When I was 24, I moved to Aberdeen, in Scotland, to start a new postgraduate degree in Artificial Intelligence. On my last night in my home town before I left to go to Aberdeen, I celebrated with childhood friends in a local restaurant, which had a little dance floor and a bar. In the bar, I met an ex-boyfriend, and I ignored him. He tried to speak with me, and I told him to leave me alone.

I went up to dance with my friend, and my ex-boyfriend followed me and continued to hassle me. His first punch came from nowhere and I only remember being hit directly in the face, and everything going red, and falling backwards. I don’t remember anything after that punch. I only remember, vaguely, my friend Christine screaming and screaming and screaming and I could only hear her, and everything was red. I remember idly wondering why she was screaming but then I lost consciousness. I only woke up the next day in bed, covered in scratches and bruises and I felt like I had bad whiplash.

After the punch that took me to the floor, he hauled me up by one arm and was punching me with the other. Then, I was kicked about on the dancefloor, unconscious. My ex-boyfriend was pulled off me and he went to the bar. I was taken home by my friend in a taxi. I don’t remember any of it. I wasn’t drinking much because I am not a heavy drinker; it was the initial punch that took me out. I weigh about 100 pounds and I’m not quite five foot two. It was no contest, really.

After that, the bar/restaurant went back to normal; people eating, drinking. I have no awareness of the events after my attack. All I do know is that my ex was told to leave the bar, and some men in the bar followed my ex-boyfriend outside. They beat him unconscious in an act of revenge, which I did not instigate. I do not approve and there is no joy in it for me.

The next day, I decided I would go to the police, after going to the hospital. As I learned about the events afterwards, I began to understand that I could not go to the police. I didn’t want the very well-meaning men to get into any trouble; their attack on him had been down to his attack on me. So, I felt responsible, even though I was not there.

His mother called me to see if I was ok. She told me that she’d raised a monster, and that I should stay away from him. And I did; I never saw him again. I started my postgraduate degree with my body covered in the vestiges of his attack on me. He used to wear a ring and I had scratches from where it landed on my body, with the weight of his fist behind it.

I am writing about it now because, all these years later, I regret not going to the Police and reporting it. I had so many witnesses, and I should not have felt responsible for the actions of the well-meaning men who wreaked revenge on him. But I did. I think that victims can feel that all problems end with them, and that they are the only ones who can fix things even though they are the victim. That’s why you end up absorbing so much.

I never felt any victory that he’d got beaten up. I don’t think he learned anything at all. I learned a few years later that he’d attacked his then-current girlfriend, a woman I vaguely knew. I felt responsible for her.

I don’t think that those well-meaning men should have beaten him up. This deprived me of control of the situation. Revenge was not theirs to give; it was mine to take, going through the courts and speaking to the Police. It is the best way to secure long-term sanctions on their behaviour. I understand that they thought they were doing the right thing. I did not hear about their revenge attack until the next day, and I was aghast. I understand that they felt that they had to do something.

My choice? For me, honestly, being a witness, and making my voice louder, would have been the right thing to do in the longer-term. By taking action in place of me, they essentially took my control, my choices and my voice away from me; my experience, my suffering, went unheard. I was not being allowed to drive the situation, and that’s what I wanted. I wasn’t consulted. I don’t believe women are weak fools at all and I don’t need people to speak for me. I just need my voice to be helped to carry, and, by ‘speaking’ for me, they were taking away from me the very things that would secure the most likely outcome for ensuring that he did not do it again.

Women need to be heard and believed. We don’t need talked for, talked at, or talked over. When we talk about #MeToo incidents, often you will hear women say that they feel better after speaking out. They don’t say that they feel better because someone else did something or spoke for them; they want control back. Loss of control means no options, and not having options is a terrible way to live your life.

By going to the Police and trying to secure a conviction against him, I could have helped to make sure that he would have had a record, which would have warned off future victims. And I was wrong not to see that. In the later incident, the one I wrote about in the MeToo blog, I was very well aware that other women would suffer in the same way I did, so I did my best to make sure it was stopped before it started. That made me feel responsible, and I have paid the price of the highest level of guilt since since I was not successful in the process. Victim blaming can often include the victim themselves, and we do not need told what to do. The world will make you feel small, if you let it.

After the separate #MeToo incident, I was given some medical counselling. Due to a shortage, during the counselling process, I was paired with a male counsellor and I am going to call him Edward. Edward taught me many things. He taught me that your friends are not the ones who spend time with you or who even like you. Edward helped me to see that I had choices, even though I felt that my choices were taken away from me. Edward helped me to feel as if I had control back, even though the control of everything, even that of my own body, had been slipping away from me. In doing these things, Edward helped me to get my voice back.

I never got to thank Edward. One day, I called to speak to him, and I was told that he’d fallen ill, and he wasn’t coming back. I never called again. One of my regrets in life is that I never got to thank him and I hope that he found someone in his life as precious and supportive of him, as he was to me. There are good people there and they flit in and out of our lives, leaving a thread of love that you can see if you are looking for it.

Inspired by Edward, who strove to ‘to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world’, I am going to put forward a list of what you can do to help. This is based on a few sources, but mainly Rape Crisis Scotland should be credited here.

Do:

  • Listen. Good or ‘active’ listening means you help the victim develop their own
    thoughts so they can look at options and make their own decisions. It’s not up to you.
  • Stay calm.
  • Be comfortable with silence.
  • Encourage
  • Take notes
  • Ensure safety
  • Read this list from RAINN in case an incident has happened
  • Listen. Keep the cakehole shut.
  • Accept and don’t judge
  • Be patient.
  • Take the lead from the victim– it is important for them to feel in control
  • Avoid asking intrusive questions.
  • Learn about sexual violence and its effects
  • Learn about ways of coping with these effects
  • Ask them what they need from you
  • Look after yourself too
  • If you think what you’re going to say sounds thoughtless, it probably is. So shut up.

Don’t:

  • Judge
  • Instruct
  • Decide for the victim
  • Feel responsible
  • Ask loaded questions, opinions and comments such as ‘you could have done such and such couldn’t you?’ or ‘you must be feeling terrible?’
  • Use ‘should’ or ‘if I were you’. If you are going to do tell me what to do, just go away. You are not helping.

I’m going to end, as I sometimes do, with a poem.

“Even in our sleep,

pain which cannot forget,
falls drop by drop upon the heart until,

in our own despair,
against our will,
comes wisdom

through the awful grace of God.” – Aeschylus

So how many badass female inventors, role models do you know? Here’s a handy starter book list to share and inspire

How do you inspire girls to make choices that inspire them? How can we inspire girls to be badass and yes, it is a compliment? How do you give them role models?

There is nothing worse in the world that not having any choices. So let’s give our daughters the chance to have options and choices, just like boys. Don’t filter them out before they get started.

I’m in data and technology (my uncle was at Bletchley Park) and I was inspired to learn to program as an eight-year-old girl by a spy who cracked Japanese codes whilst hiding out in India. I was extremely lucky to be taught by someone who knew Alan Turing personally and was friends with Ludwig Wittgenstein, but many folks don’t know where to start. They just know that they have to harness their daughter’s enthusiasm somehow. And there is nothing wrong with boys reading these books either…. or anyone else. My son can read these books and say ‘wow, Hedy LaMarr was awesome!’ and that’s great to hear, right?

On Twitter, I saw the British historian and BBC presenter Dan Snow post the following tweet:

What Mr Snow may not have expected is that there were many responses about the fact that many inspiring women in history get forgotten, or even written out of history. Think Bletchley Park; how many famous women do you know from there? There were thousands of female workers at Bletchley Park there but we only hear about the men.

It’s time to right this wrong, and Snow’s tweet got me thinking. Some mentioned some of their favourite books that focused on women who inspire, in order to show their daughters a different way. Example:

WE NEED MORE OF THIS! We often talk about girls needing role models, and we end up being caught in a paradox.

How do we inspire girls with role models, if there aren’t any role models? How do we get role models, if we can’t inspire girls?

Before you read below… how many women can you think of? A quick poll of people around me produces ‘that woman who invented Tippex and was David Bowie’s mother’ – three things with that; a. stop defining her as a mother b. remember her own name as well c. she wasn’t David Bowie’s mother (!). A quick research shows that Bette Nesmith Graham actually was the mother of one of the Monkees. In a reverse Handmaid’s Tale sort of way, you might call him Michael OfBette. If you haven’t read Handmaid’s Tale, please do; it will make you angry because it is so plausible. It will make you scared for how the world could go, and that’s exactly why you should read it.

Well, the good people of Twitter started to put the world to rights again, when people started to note their own favourite books, which showcase women in a variety of fields. I am listing them here, and please do add more in the comments.

I do not get paid for recommending books because that’s plain grubby and money-grabbing. I’m recommending these because the good folks of Twitter recommended them, and I will be reading them myself.

Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls – recommended by James O’Flynn

Fantastically Great Women Who Changed The World by Kate Pankhurst – recommended by James O’Flynn

Rejected Princesses: Tales of History’s Boldest Heroines, Hellions, and Heretics by Jason Porath and recommended by Jenny Colledge

Tough Mothers: Amazing Stories of History’s Mightiest Matriarchs by Jason Porath

These books are perhaps more for the adults:

Laurel A Rockefeller writes a series aimed at women in history

As I said, I’m into technology so I have to recommend Programmed Inequality (History of Computing): How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing. Written by Marie Hicks, it will inspire and hurt and you will learn something about how Britain can do better. Plus, WELCOME TO MY LIFE, PEOPLE.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood – If you don’t read it, then you have to watch it. It’s painful because it’s articulate, insightful and it feels so close to the surface that you can almost touch the dark reality that’s not so far away from ours.

So, Mr Snow, if you ever decide to do a series on female badass characters throughout history, I think  you’ll have a very interested audience. #SubtleHint

I want better things for our children, boys and girls. If you are reading this far – Well done you – and it gives me hope that we might miss out on the dystopian future in The Handmaid’s Tale after all.

It’s about giving girls choices. If your daughter wants to be a mommy and wear pink, that’s fine. But if she also wants to be a car mechanic or scientist or save the world through environmental science, she shoudl be able to do that too.

 

Cloud computing as a leveler and an enabler for Diversity and Inclusion

I had the honour and pleasure of meeting a young person with autism recently who is interested in learning about Azure and wanted some advice on extending his knowledge.
It was a great reminder that we can’t always see people who have conditions such as autism. It also extends to disability, particularly those that you can’t see; examples include epilepsy or even Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Diversity gives us the opportunity to become more thoughtful, empathetic human beings.

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Credit: https://pixabay.com/en/users/geralt-9301/

I love cloud because it’s a great leveler for people who want to step into technology. It means that these personal quirks, or differences, or ranges of abilities can be sidestepped since we don’t need to all fit the brogrammer model in order to be great at cloud computing. Since we can do so many things remotely, it means that people can have flexibility to work in ways that suit them.

In my career, I couldn’t lift a piece of Cisco kit to rack it, because I was not strong enough. With cloud, it’s not a problem. The literally heavy lift-and-shift is already done. It really comes down to a willingness to learn and practice. I can also learn in a way that suits me, and that was the main topic of conversation with the autistic youth that I had the pleasure to meet.

I believe that people should be given a chance. Diversity gives us the opportunity to become more thoughtful, empathetic human beings. In this world, there is nothing wrong with wanting more of that humanness.